Bedspaces

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So the good news is… no growth from bronchoscopy. Relieved. However, due to her cough persisting despite domestos antibiotics we are in for another 7 days.

So this had me thinking. As a doctor I often look at the patient’s bedspace. It tells you a lot about them and who their friends and family are. It’s your ‘home’ when you are in hospital. Fruit and chocolates may remain uneaten. Cards and photos displayed. Sputum bottles, urine bottles and who knows what else. I took a picture of Minty’s hospital table today. Cards, medicines, high calorie food, toys, drinks and much more.

I’d love to see other photos and put them up for others to see on this blog. If you are a patient, take a pic of your bed table (with appropriate permissions) and send it to me. Tweet it to @morefluids. Let me know your age and a bit about you. Thanks for sharing!

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Impatiently Waiting

Dolly is getting a wash.

Dolly is getting a wash.

Still no microbiology results. It’s been a week since her admission. I started to worry about the lateness of this results. Largely in part due to her newborn screen taking three weeks as they verified her rare CF gene. I started thinking they are repeating things. Something must be bad. But apparently everyone’s are delayed due to the bank holiday. I hope so. I really hope so.

One week down and I cannot wait to pack up her things and take her home. The thought of one more week is driving me mad. I feel that the family is fragmented into small bits and we are all apart. Zac is being looked after by our lovely nanny Jema, he’s managing somehow. Minty wakes up each morning and calls Zac through the door. My older girls are trying to keep themselves busy this half term, largely looking after themselves as I cannot take them anywhere really. It feels like I’ve not seen them at all in weeks. I miss them all. I just want us all together in one house at the same time. It’s made worse by both my husband and I have a particularly bad run of shifts at work. We’ve not had a weekend together as a family in two months. But that’s another story.

Minty has changed in the past week. She has grown up. I’ve changed. We’ve all changed but I don’t know how. You would never know in looking at her what she is taking in her stride. Her long line is still leaking but still in place. Her wee smells bad, one of the antibiotics I assume. She’s coping well in one small room. The room is hot. Stifling at night. It’s hard to sleep. It’s no wonder patients spike temperatures all the time. We run in and take cultures when perhaps all that’s needed is a open window! She’s taken to cleaning the room with baby wipes, then sucking them. This is driving my CF mum and infection control side bonkers. She wipes the bins, under things, cupboards, then wipes her face, sucks it and laughs. Argh!! When I take away the offending wipe she screams in utter fury. How dare you, she looks. She then wipes the floor, our shoes and then her face. My mind boggles with MRSA, E Coli and who knows what else. The more I try and stop her, the more determined she is. She sees the cleaners in the room several times a day and is copying them. She gives meds to her dollies and who knows, perhaps one day she will be a doctor or a nurse (I hope not!)

Being on the other side of ‘doctoring’ I am so much more aware of how patients must feel. We wait. We wait all the time.

For results.

For medicines.

For ward rounds.

For time to pass.

For medicines to work.

For tests.

For going home.

For drinks.

For meals.

For discharge plans.

For discharge letters.

For discharge meds.

We learned in medical school how patients adopt the sick role. To a certain extent you have to as everything is beyond your control you have to accept that you will wait and rely upon those around you. The waiting is of no means a criticism of the staff that are caring for her. They are caring for loads of other patients too. We are all flat out. It’s the way the system seems to operate, the culture of being in hospital. I never fully realised when you sit there waiting all day to chat to the doctors, the few minutes they come in and out is a flash in a very long day. You always are left with questions.

On a positive note, we’re learning some great new physiotherapy techniques from her twice daily physio sessions. She’s enjoying them and we can’t wait to add them to our routine at home.

Tomorrow our Magical Minty Skydive Team is collecting money for the CF Trust. Very exciting indeed. A permit has been granted by the council, so in Park Street and Queen’s Rd, Bristol buckets and t-shirts are out. We may try and pop out if we can. It’s only 1/2 a mile or so from the children’s hospital.

Thank you to everyone who has supported us so far. Thanks for messages and emails x

Magical Minty – Early Days of First Admission with Cystic Fibrosis

This is my magical Minty. At 16 months she is showing me a thing or two about life, always smiling and just carrying on with things despite facing things many adults with never face.  But today I am feeling angry. No wait.. tearful, optimistic, scared, exhausted, worried. I’ve no idea really. A mixed bag of emotions. I would say the past few days have been unpleasant. Though the extra snuggles and joy I’m getting from Minty make it better. As does watching her cheeky face wave at babies in neighbouring hospital rooms or her stern glare when nurses or doctors try to talk to her.

Friday was the worst day by far. She was nil-by-mouth from the morning, wheezy and waiting for a bed. At 11.30 am still no bed. Then the bed managers juggled and she had a bed. On the list for general anaesthetic and bronchoscopy at 2pm. Bags packed for a long hospital stay (10-14 days expected on IV antibiotics) we arrived. Taking her down for anaesthetic was scary. Holding her in my arms as she was put to sleep was awful. I tried to remain calm for her, snuggling and kissing. Truth was I was 20 times more scared than when I’ve had my own anaesthetic. Leaving her in the care of others and walking away in tears. We passed the time with difficulty. Uncertain what to do. Coffee?? Stomach couldn’t digest it anyway. After 2 1/2 hours of waiting we became very anxious and just wanted her back in our arms. The bronchoscopy was done, the thing that took the longest was inserting her long line. They couldn’t get a PICC in due to her chubby arms (lovely things they are) and had to settling for a Leader Cath (never heard of it), sort of a short long line. It won’t last her length of antibiotics so we will cross that bridge when we have too. But I fear it involves another GA.

Having her back in my arms screaming and smelling of sevoflurane was a huge relief. The first night was terrible, she thrashed and had a chest sounding like a bag of wet sponges. She spiked temps, had a fast respiratory rate and fast pulse. I tried to sleep in the pull down bed next to her, but found myself staring at the monitor and numbers all night. Pulse 116 – good. 168 – not good. And so it went on. Being a doctor and a mum can be a worrying combination.

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Messing about with daddy!

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Trying to escape – Day 2

 

Dose of steroids and some salbutamol and in the morning she was much brighter. She’s on Tobramycin, flucloxacillin and ceftazidime for antibiotics. She’s almost back to normal now. But she’s exhausted and running on adrenaline. Her nap routine and sleep is totally obliterated and she’s all over the place. I have stayed with her since Friday night and had a guilty night home last night when daddy has stayed with her. I’m getting ready to go down as soon as possible as I don’t want to miss the ward round. She’s cultured haemophilus influenzae so far. No idea what this means in terms of her normal prophylactic regime. Was hoping she might get discharged early, but probably not so. Counting the hours until she is home and normal family life resumes. Just want her home. Good thing is she comes home between doses. From about 11.30-5 we are at home, which is great. I am incredibly grateful we live 15 mins away from the regional CF team. The hospital is very good and nurses and doctors have been lovely. Thank you.

Her siblings miss her terribly. She wakes up in the morning shouting their names as if they are also in hospital ready to play! Better go now. But some leaving thoughts from being on the ‘other side’.

Bed managers are important, people are waiting at home to come in. Whole families waiting on news of a bed.

Be considerate when talking loudly during night shifts. The hospital is our home for a couple weeks and being woken constantly is terrible. Sleep deprivation is terrible. Same goes for noisy families – keep it down PLEASE!!!

Discharge letters are important. I overheard an SHO responding when asked to do the TTA. ‘WE ARE ON THE WARD ROUND. IT WILL JUST HAVE TO WAIT’. I heard the tears of an anxious mum and lively 5 year old desperate to be home for the weekend. The fact that the TTAs cannot be processed after 2pm may not be important to you, but that meant that child could be home on a bank holiday weekend and that bed would be free for another waiting patient. I’ve been guilty of this ward round business. Perhaps we should have a dedicated discharge letter doctor somedays. It would be a rubbish shift but have an amazing impact in many ways.

With regards to our skydive. Minty’s hospital stay has lead to a few changes. She’s going to be discharged a few days before and will need one parent at home with her. Doesn’t feel right leaving her. So I am jumping with the skydive team and my husband will jump 2 weeks later. Her hospital stay has made me EVEN MORE DETERMINED. This is a lousy illness, it is unacceptable. We must must must find a cure or support people and their families with cystic fibrosis. If you have a pound or two to spare, please donate to our Magical Minty Skydive Team – we’ve raised over £4400 so far. AMAZING and thank you soo much for every single penny. If you haven’t seen our fundraising video – have a peek!

More soon… By the way. I had thought about not posting as I don’t want to be constantly bombarding people with woe is us news. But lots of people have been asking.

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Waiting for her IVs – Day 3

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After her GA. Washed out

First Hospital Admission

Sudden turn of events. Life has now been refocused on what’s important. Minty has been fighting off a nasty cold for weeks. She became quite unwell yesterday afternoon, worse this morning. I took her to the children’s hospital today, by the sound of her breathing I knew this wasn’t like her usual infections. So tomorrow she goes in for a general anaesthetic, bronchoscopy and long line (central or picc) for 2 weeks IV antibiotics. It’s the day we’ve been trying to avoid. She’s at home now running around like mad after prednisolone and salbutamol. You’d never know she was unwell!

Going to be staying in with her. We are allowed out for home visits etc. Lovely Minty, always smiling.

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Cystic Fibrosis is… Our fundraising video for @cftrust! Please share! @cfaware

This fundraising business is huge fun. Humbling, overwhelming and building great bonds with community, friends and family. If you can’t donate please share our video. Huge thanks to our team member and producer Rachel Cowie. Huge thanks to everyone who participated so far.

Donations welcome – http://www.justgiving.com/mintyskydive Thank You!

5/6/14 – 3pm Update

From another CF parent, we have befriended each other via social media. It’s CF Awareness Month. Let’s raise awareness. Get well soon Austin.

For Austin Woods

Austin is currently taking a nap so I finally have some time to write a quick update. We are STILL waiting for his RSV culture to come back, which sucks because until it comes back, Austin is not allowed to go outside of his room! His breathing rate is still fast, but his lungs do sound better according to his respiratory therapists, doctors and pulmonary team. His constipation is no longer existent with the help of 1/2 a packet of Miralax a day in his morning bottle.

As for the bronchoscopy, it is officially scheduled for Thursday at 3pm, however we are still not sure if it is going to happen. The main reason they want to do it is to get a really good deep lung culture to see what kind of stuff he is growing in there. This will help them determine if his current antibiotics need to…

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