Survey of Junior Doctor Parents Show More Than 50% Considering Leaving NHS England

jdcchildMore than 1000 junior doctor parents have spoken up voicing grave concerns about the new contract, set to be imposed this August. In an online survey conducted in April 2016, 99.4% consider the contract will have a detrimental effect on their family life and less than 5% of respondents plan to continue their career as it currently is. 93% consider the proposed contract will have a detrimental effect on their relationship with spouse or partner. More than 25% are considering leaving the profession altogether, with a further 26% considering a move to another country.

“There are around 54,000 junior doctors. A junior doctor is anyone graduated from medical school up to consultant or GP level. Most are of child rearing ages and many have children. When doctor recruitment is already in crisis and only 5% of junior doctor parents plan to continue as is, imposition of this contract could throw the entire doctor workforce into disarray,” states survey creator, Dr Sethina Watson, junior doctor and mother of four. “This contract threatens both lives of medic children and, with a potentially reduced workforce, the lives of patients too.”

The survey asked a range of questions on current level of training, current and potential childcare and whether or not they envisaged continuing their current career should the contract be imposed. The survey identifies extreme difficulties in finding childcare, 93% state that finding childcare with the new contract will be more difficult. The governments equality analysis of the Junior Doctor contract openly states that it disadvantages women but that this ‘indirect adverse effect on women is a proportionate means of achieving a legitimate aim’. The equality analysis suggests that some women may find it easier to arrange informal, unpaid childcare in the evenings and weekends. The survey results showed that nearly 60% of respondents do not have access to such childcare. Of those who do, 86% believe it will be unreliable for ensuring attendance at work. There may be a surge in doctors requesting part-time working, which can still entail up to 55 hours per week.

Of particular concern are the doctor and doctor couples that comprise nearly 40% of those who responded. “I cannot imagine how it would be tolerable if the frequency of our weekend working were to increase; I could easily imagine this causing marital and family breakdown,” said one married male doctor.

Jeremy Hunt’s rush to impose the contract threatens to create a potential time bomb that could explode as early as August as thousands of junior doctor parents struggle to find childcare or quit their jobs. The legacy could harm generations of children and lead to a loss of thousands of years of medical training from the workforce.

Survey Results Summary:

  • 1060 Respondents
  • 84% aged 30-44
  • 82% female
  • 84% married/civil partnership
  • 38% have doctor partner/spouse
  • 38% full time employment, 41% less-than-full-time
  • 39% caring for one, 39% caring for two
  • 59% use nursery and 58% spouse for additional childcare
  • 34% ST 5+
  • Of those choosing to stay in medicine 58% will stay in speciality
  • 40% spend between 20-39% of net household income on childcare
  • 58% do not have access to unpaid informal childcare, those who do 86% say not robust or reliable enough for work
  • If contract comes in 48% plan to use partner for childcare, 48% don’t know what they will do (you could have more than one answer for combination arrangements)
  • 75% expect to pay for this additional childcare
  • 93% said that finding more childcare would be more difficult
  • 4.6% will continue their career as it currently is
  • Those considering other options 87% cite impact on children, 79% impact on spouse, 53% cannot afford further childcare, 77% emotional strain and stress as key factors
  • 74% state the proposed contract will definitely have a detrimental impact on their relationship with spouse/partner (19% state probably)
  • 93% state it will definitely have a detrimental effect on family life and 6% say it probably will

Complete survey findings are available JDCchildcaresurvey2016.

Survey conducted by Dr Sethina Watson, Anaesthetics Trainee, mother of four and former founder of MomMD.com. Follow me on Twitter @morefluids.

For a short link to this survey use http://wp.me/p3pm8R-bk

Featured in The Guardian – Junior doctors: ‘over half could quit NHS England over Hunt’s contract’ and Hospitals braced for walkout as Hunt says doctors’ strike must be defeated.

For more information on the survey and permission to use findings, please contact me below

Being a Junior Doctor & Parenting a Child with Cystic Fibrosis

Last week junior doctors staged another strike in opposition to the proposed enforcement of Hunt’s Junior Contract. A contract which most doctors believe will endanger patient lives and destroy the NHS. On the eve on the third strike, while my daughter recovered from anaesthetic I wrote the following piece.

“My husband and I are both junior doctors. Unfortunately, we cannot join the picket line this time.

We aren’t there because we are in hospital with this little one.

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Smiling despite low oxygen saturation and high fever.

Our three year old daughter has cystic fibrosis. She’s not been well recently and she’s in for a general anaesthetic, bronchoscopy, fixed intravenous line and two-week course of heavy duty antibiotics. The NHS is so vital for her care and future. We have no doubt that she will be well cared for the next two strike days.
The junior doctor fight is for every patient and every person working in the NHS. Doctors looking after her (and everyone else) should be well rested, motivated and valued. She starts nursery soon, we’d like to see her and our other children at weekends. We already work many weekends away from them. CF shows us that life is precious; it is too short.

Doctors involved in her care over the next two weeks will be many; junior doctors, respiratory consultants, anaesthetists, radiologists and microbiologists. But also ward nurses, recovery nurses, operating department practicioners, specialist nurses, student nurses, ward clerks, pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, porters, health care assistants, domestics, dieticians, psychologists, physiotherapists, radiographers, play specialists and more. Behind the scenes are lab technicians, estates workers, IT staff, medical secretaries, central sterile services team, theatre managers, ward managers, volunteers, security staff and a huge long list of others.

We all work together for our patients. We make something pretty amazing. To think that adding just junior doctors to the ward at the weekend is all that is needed ignores the rest of that amazing team.

When times are tough, we remember this phrase, ‘Dum Spiro Spero’. It means while I breathe I hope. Perhaps one day there will be be a cure for CF. We try to remain hopeful about the junior doctor ‘fight’ too.

Junior doctors are standing up for the future of the NHS. Let’s all stand together. Good luck, we’ve got our badges and banners on the ward ready for tomorrow. She says a big thank you for everyone looking after her.

Mr Hunt, I request that you engage with us and take our concerns seriously.”

Since then, she has been recuperating in hospital and faces further treatments prior to discharge home. The contract in short, may mean many doctors simply cannot afford to work in the NHS, whether financially or emotionally. Minty’s story was featured in The Independent and on Doctors of the NHS.

As always, fundraising for the CF Trust is a goal. Minty’s Godfather and family friend aim to cycle from London to Paris to raise money. Find out more about Magical Minty Cycling Team on Facebook or donate here.

To understand more about the Junior Doctor contract this recent Facebook post is an excellent summary.